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20121201
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forces in there in the street using politics and the ballot box. the point i was trying to stress, may last point is the u.s. writ large, the government and also civil society organization and others are largely standing on the sideline here. bob's organization put out an excellent report last week people should look at my organization. usip data private study. right now u.s. policy, also civil society and others were sitting on the sidelines here or there was a desire among local forces including younger islamists who want to bring about changes in their political movement in for the large purse sitting on the sidelines here we need to do more. >> we need to move on to the q&a portion here. a few questions from the audience. if you have a question, research and peer to microphone circulating. 10 minutes before we begin to wrap a. >> my name is -- [inaudible] -- washington d.c. what's missing on discussions is the fact that islamists have nothing to offer except for sharia law and muslims are fed up with the sharia law. the other point is there's a new new generation of arabs that face
not to meet with us. the message about our concern, again, not just those of the united states but britain and france come we traveled there as the t-3, three permanent members of the security council who have worked together on many issues. but we did speak with the foreign minister, plus some of her colleagues. again, we raised the issue of the need to and outside support. as in previous discussions, the rwandan government strongly, vehemently denies that it is providing any assistance to the m23, and it has not taken the steps of publicly denouncing on a bilateral basis the m23. so we have raised this, and it's important that we continue to monitor this as others in the international community do on a very, very close basis. with respect to your second question about international support, or at least our bilateral support to the rwandan government, i start with what i said to congressman marino earlier, is that they utilize their international assistance, not only from us in particular, but others very, very effectively and to use it with great integrity. people get it. we are not prov
it is not. america is the oldest country in the modern world. because the american constitution provided us with a template for classless democracy. not the america that she did but certainly that was the ideological template around it. india is important, 1947, because india is the oldest nation and the postcolonial world. and the indian constitution similarly creates an ideological template for democracy. but with the emergence of india also emerged china, and china had a different template. again, not getting into what is right and what is wrong, but these are alternative -- how to run your nation and postcolonial society. and very interesting we received in comparison to parties, won the congress and the chinese communist party. actually became the dominant force in the post-independent state. one advocate would have to be -- because both emerge from ravaged economically driven set of needs. the congress offered soft left. the chinese offered hard left, or autocratic left. a long story, both had -- >> you said long story shorter i want to get to the short part. spent discussing it with
senator mark warner on his plan to allow more highly-skilled immigrants into the u.s. at 8 eastern on c-span2, the president and incoming ceo of the nation's second biggest provider of medicare health plans, and at 8 eastern on c-span3, a discussion on scientific predictions about the future and the impact they have on public policy. .. but i think that there's no other art form so readily accessible other than perhaps film, which we work with, too. but it is something -- there is something in literature that just captures the human spirit. >> this weekend, we look behind the scenes at the history and literary life of new york's capital city, albany. saturday at noon eastern on booktv own c-span2, and sunday at 5:00 p.m. on american history tv on c-span3. >> now, a former iranian political prisoner talks about the abuse she suffered. she is joined bay former obama administration at visor on iran who discusses iran's program. the foundation for the defense of democracies held this event. >> good morning. it's a very interesting panel so i want to get quickly into questions. very quickly
the state department released a review of the attack on the u.s. consulate benghazi and found, could come systemic failures and leadership management deficiencies. just after the report was released, as to state departments testified about the attack before the house foreign affairs committee. [inaudible conversations] [inaudible conversations] the committee will come to order. after recognizing myself and the ranking member for seven minutes each for our opening statement we will then hear from our witnesses, deputy secretary william burns and deputy secretary tom, no strangers to what is we can allow the members to question our witnesses correctly as soon as possible we will forgo additional billing statements and instead i will recognize each member for six minutes following the presentation by the witnesses fought secretary clinton was scheduled to be here today but we have had to reschedule if her parents do to the unfortunate injury for which we wish her a speedy and healthy recovery. she has a confirmed once again she has every intention of testifying before our committee by mid ja
, but thank you so much james capretta for joining us. >> since 1901, the joint congressional committee congressional committee on a macro ceremonies has been responsible for the planning execution of the inauguration of the president of the u.s. capitol. >> we are glad you are all here, this is the platform were the inauguration will take place. it is on schedule, it is on budget. our job, senator alexander and myself were in charge of this part of the inauguration. it is the presidential inaugural committee. it is also known as pic. let me review some numbers and specifics. the first inaugural on the west front was ronald reagan's ceremony in 1981. the person in charge of building the platform is steve ayers, the architect of the capital. the platform will be about 10,000 square feet. the same size as the platform in 2005, which was the largest platform ever built. as you know, on this there will be 1600 people were comes to this platform. it has to be very strong. the former president, joins you, governors, and the diplomatic corps. one of which comes from brooklyn, one comes from ne
with all designated persons connected to the iranian government. it bans trade and commodities used, it is designed to stop iran from busting sanctions by receiving payment in gold or using oil payments in local currency to buy gold. we have got to stop an effort to water down these sanctions. i say that because i remember the votes in the past, i remember our effort on the central bank. it was only because we got unanimous votes because we got so much sport that we were able to deploy those. let me add there's another portion of the amendments here that targets the regime for their human rights abuses and i think one of the areas where we have really been short, for those of you who talked to those who have been in the prisons, who have experienced the torture, seen the murder, experience the rapes, those are routine. iranian officials are involved in that activity but also in massive corruption preventing humanitarian assistance, food and medicine from reaching the iranian people, they are the beneficiaries of some of this and this new amendment would authorize the administration
. .. >> his judgment and the aarp's judgment is there's simply not enough time to use military force to respond and make a difference in that situation, but you raise a very good, broader question, and it's certainly something we'll work through with the colleagues and pentagon and elsewhere in the administration. >> mr. chairman, given, again, the potential for unrest across the middle east, i would hope that we follow-up on this specific question because it seems to me to be critical as we look at the situation going forward, and i will just conclude by adding my personal thanks and appreciation to the senator lugar. it's truly been an honor to serve with you, and you leave a tremendous legacy for this committee and for the country. thank you. >> senator, thank you. let me say i just thought a lot about what you said with respect to the availability of teams or forces with respect to emergency extraction, and/or emergency response in various parts of the world, and i think it's something we really need to pay attention to and think about in terms of deployment and preparedness so
to provide new housing opportunities through the use of project based vouchers. some of these suggest stream line processes and hud section 8 project base rental assistant program. we have invited secretary -- assistant secretary here to share the administration's recommendations on this important topic and i look forward to learning where there may be consensus around common sense reforms that will turn to section 8 an public housing assistant programs for families, partners, and taxpayers. are there any other members -- [laughter] >> that's a good question. >> yeah do you wish to make a brief opening statement? >> mr. chairman, thank you again, for holding this hearing, very important. welcome, madam secretary, and i look forward to your testimony thank you. thank you, mr. chairman. >> thank you all and i want to remind my colleagues that the record will be open for the next seven days for opening statements and any materials who would like to submit. i will briefly introduce the honorable senator enriques the depart
and hawaii. that's he humility he showed his entire life. there was no staff there just the two of us. we talked for an hour. i would always remember -- having passed away yesterday, it will be imbedded in my mind. as we left, we both thought about fact we had not been able to sit down and talk like that enough. he professed at that time -- his words -- how lucky he has been his whole life. he said i got at emphysema now. i said, not from smoking. he said, i learn to smoke in the war as a boy. he smoked from 1944 to 1967. he told me he had lung cancer. but they were wrong. they took part of his lung out. he talked about how lucky he had been with surviving what he fought with lung can certification but how lucky he had been his while life, for example, the war. i'm sure people would not reflect on his massive injuries as being lucky. butth but he considered he was lucky to have lived. he had been called upon with three other people, three other soldiers, to cross a river in the dark of night, to find out what was going on, on the other side of the river, and he and his three companions, i
protect us from other storms in the future. a while back i was talking with a good friend of mine and i asked her he was doing. his response was, compared to a? it's really a good way to look at how sandy has affected us in delaware compared to our neighbors to the north. we are doing okay. this sandy didn't spare delaware and we have produced beyond our state's ability to provide. from the moment it is clear we are in the storm's path, i've been grateful for the work of governor jack martel and his entire team. state, county, local officials, first responders, american red cross, national guard, many volunteers are hoped to protect the residents as it approached and well after it passed. president obama, fema, the rest of the administration's team working hand in glove with their state team. in this case there was really a team. as i like to say there is no i in the word team. i should have the army corps of engineers has been particular in responding to hurricane sandy. over the years, funded by a series of storm protection projects in maryland are polite, robust and strong, hea
negotiations. this is about a half an hour. [inaudible conversations] >> morning. thank you all for joining us this morning. i'm maya macguineas, i am working with the campaign to fix the debt, and i'm the president for the committee for a responsible federal budget, and i'm really excited to join a phenomenal panel that we have with us today to help the campaign fix the debt which is, um, a large, nonpartisan coalition that is focused on helping members of congress come together to put in place a comprehensive debt deal. so i'm very delighted that today what we have is a diverse and very experienced, um, group of panelists to talk about two major topics; tax reform and health care reform. all in the context of how are we going to work together to put in place a plan that would be able to tackle the nation's fiscal challenges. we will hear numerous different opinions, we will hear plenty of disagreement, and i hope we'll hear a lot of ideas about how to generate different, um, useful reforms to the budget that can help get a big deal put in place. and none of us should forget that what's going
, mobile banking. a whole a ray of services that we can now deliver because we are connected using this frontier technology. and that is such a powerful, powerful thing. it will have legs for the next 20 years, not to mention everything else that my friend talks about in his book on abundance, but it creates so many possibilities. >> who is the it coming prosperity written for? >> well, you know, it's written for the folks watching the show. and it's written for general audience in the united states but globally. i start in the u.s., i and in the u.s.. i feel as though the story is particularly needed in the united states. i don't believe that people in pakistan or china need to hear this because the seat. even in pakistan has really struggled with so much potential. i think it is the next greatest store, the next global opportunity and the resources we wouldn't tell people that because they would be investing heavily and the dividends with other people but it's just on the cusp of happening. really exciting. and so, it's frequent in this country. and it's for anybody that believes
to dissuade north korea from launching a missile. although they say for satellite into outer space it's using the same technology that's important, that would be used to launch a nuclear warhead. this type of missile technology is expressly covered under u.n. security council resolutions, prohibiting such testing of missiles and the type of technology, supported by china even. the last time in spring when china tried to launch a satellite, but it failed using this technology, china said we need to come out with a presidential statement from the united nations on this presidential statement condemning the actions of north korea can set the stage for tougher actions in the future if china -- if north korea were to launch another missile. that missile has been launched. we now think it's time for tougher actions since her engaging diplomatically with china and other members of the u.n. security council on tougher resolutions and possibly sanctions against north korea. >> make any progress quick >> if you type to the state department to figure out what's going on. we've conveyed very frankly, can
" that sprung from the awful doldrums of the u.s. economy under jimmy carter apply stronger, more strongly today. >> house so click >> obama is the same kind of antibusiness president and insight president. same kind of managerial, interfering, strangling, surprising president jimmy carter was. >> you writing here about president obama. i want to get to the right page so i can quote it correctly, sir. you write under the obama administration that the u.s. had a morbid subversion of the infrastructures of its economy. the public sector has become a manipulative forest, aggressively intervening in the venture and financial sectors with guarantees and subventions that attract talent and debunking. >> the worst of this is the korean cast of the obama administration. the epa now has gained control over everything. see so to have been deemed a pollution, dangerous to the environment in co2 is of course that these plans. they attempt to surprise or two epitomize the anti-nature, enterprise spirit of this administration. the reason we need another supply-side revival of the same kind we had under ronald
administration. in our opinion, government data must be published and must be publishing an useful that means it has to be standardized, machine-readable and up until now, we haven't done a very good job with that. does someone have a phone? up until now we haven't done a good job with the publication. what is our view of what the obama administration has accomplished in his first four years? has the administration made strides towards publishing the government data? yes, absolutely. has the administration published the most valuable government data? now. the data from the core of government, the information that staff members at executive branch agencies reliant to make their decision has not been published. our coalition think says government in five categories. the transparency community we spend time categorizing beautiful policy categorization, so i won't spend too much time on this. broadly speaking the outside but it's usually talk about. spending, management and performance, regulation, legislation and judicial documents. in each case, certain data is at the core of government, the me
strengths in our country that would allow us to make the kind of investment to transform the economy, to do with the reality of stagnant wages and a sense of diminished opportunities. we have strengths. we can do it. we need the public to rain and behavior that's destructive and we need political leaders to act forcefully. given enough to bipartisan commissions and searched enough for bipartisan consensus. for sensible hard all politics along these lines. >> norm, i particularly cutie take the money question. a couple political had a great shared that showed that party polarization in congress was directly correlated with increasing concentrations of wealth from increasing equality went together artisan polarization. and the money question you can handle so many different ways. i'm really concerned about it posed citizens united system with a federal election commission that's completely out of control and with other agencies unable to do anything about it. a lot of money coming in in ways that intimidate political actors until the policy process in a very bad way and the way that will only
and undeniable. it must be something like, you know, it helps us identify someone who is about to set up a nuclear bomb in new york city or something like that. it is very compelling. well, the argument is that if you use racial determination for college admissions, it is likely that there will be somewhat more -- somewhat more of unrehearsed, interracial conversations are in especially among students. under the african-american kids and a latino kids who get these preferences -- they will say something to the white kids and asian kids that have overwhelming compelling educational benefits for them. that is a argument that the university of texas is arguing. that is an exception of non-discrimination that the supreme court has recognized. okay? okay. i think that's ridiculous. and, indeed, the reason the court buys this is because there are social sciences out there and scientists who say this is true. now, increasingly, these educational benefits, which, you know, make only marginal improvements to education access, they are disputed. you know, it is increasingly disputed that their are
sons, mark, bob, john and david, and the entire lugar family, most of which is with us here in the galleries today. their strength and sacrifices have been indispensable to my public service. i'm also very much indebted to a great number of talented and loyal friends who have served with me in the senate, including, by my count, more than 300 senators, hundreds of personal and committee staff members, and more than a thousand student interns. in my experience, it is difficult to conceive of a better platform from which to devote one's self to public service and the search for solutions to national and international problems. at its best, the senate is one of the founders' most important creations. a great deal has been written recently about political discord in the united states, with some commentators judging that partisanship is at an all-time high. having seen quite a few periods in the congress when political struggles were portrayed in this way, i hesitate to describe our current state as the most partisan ever, but i do believe that as an institution, we have not live
or t.a.r.p. bailout fund was mishandled. it's about 40 minutes. >> joining us now is neil barofsky, former inspector general for t.a.r.p.. you saw him earlier on the panel. here's the cover of his bestseller. it's called bailout. .. >> i was nominated by my boss, and it was this crazy whirlwind when i had that conversation and was serving. >> what was the date he that you started? >> december 15, 2008. >> what are your politics? you the bush administration, essentially, but what are your politics? >> i have been a lifelong democrat. since i was old enough to go. vote. i have always been a registered democrat. it is actually kind of funny. when the u.s. attorney approach me and asked me if i was interested in the job, i was going to different excuses as to why didn't want to go to washington. i was very happy being with a prosecutor. i was getting married. finally, when all those arguments had failed, i said in a very dramatic way, by the way, you know that i am, in fact, a registered democrat. and he kind of winced. and i thought i came back and said i contributed to barack obama t
and friend so i decided to use my time at sea to read a novel in that language. the book i chose is a small paperback edition of jules byrnes of around the world in 80 days first published in the newspaper serial in 1872. when i wasn't on watch or otherwise busy on on the ship i slowly made my way to the book. by french was good enough to my surprise but i actually enjoyed the story and as a historian i appreciated its period details especially the nature of the protagonists they englishman racing around the world. and has remarked offhandedly travel services at could take a person round the globe in a period of 80 days. prove that he challenged him and he is off. that 80 day measure was only conceivable by the late 19th century and the age of sales getting sails getting around the world have taken months or even years. the speed of my sailing ship would have -- it was the invention of steam power but the creation of regimented european empires around the globe, the opening of the suez canal and the emergence of commercial travel services that together made it just possible by the 18 70's t
of the to u.s. patriot missile batteries as part of the nato effort to try to help protect our turkish allies against the threat of missiles from syria. even as we have asserted our strong and enduring commitment to the middle east, we are also renewing and expanding our engagement in the asia-pacific region. the core of our rebounds is modernizing our existing network of alliances and security partnerships throughout the region. and developing new security relations as well. over the past year, we reached major agreements with japan to realize our forces and jointly develop guam as a strategic hub. we afford to strengthen cooperation for the republic of korea, in space, in cyberspace, and intelligence. we begin a new marine rotational deployment to australia as well as increased air force cooperation. likewise, we are deepening our engagement and developing rotational deployment with allies and partners such as singapore and the philippines, and expanding our mil-to-mil dialogue and exchanges with china. we are also enhancing our presence and capabilities in the region. that includes reality
of tomorrow's only broadband and not broadcast. >> host: senator gordon smith joins us as we begin part of discussions on the future of television. he is the president and ceo of the national association of broadcasters. thank you, sir. >> guest: thank you. >> host: and ted gotsch of "telecommunications report," thank you b the for being on "the communicators." >> thanks for having me. >> just ahead, the first of two forums from a recent conference examining the 201 2 elections with jeremy byrd. then two secretaries of state discuss the impact of voter id laws. after that we're hive from the brookings institution on the future of egypt following it constitutional refer dumb, and later another live forum examining a proposal to raise medicare's eligibility age. >> also today a discussion with some of the leaders who have helped create what's known as e-government. this month marks the tenth anniversary of the act that was helped to allow federal agencies to deliver information for mishtly using the -- efficiently using the internet. you can see live coverage beginning at 9 a.m. eastern o
the importance of the latino vote. for many of us that followed these issues from -- some like roberto with great expertise, others like me, with much more general recall -- generality, for the past couple of decree okayed we said the latino vote is going to matter in the national elections. this is the year the latino vote comes home. i think after a while we stopped believing it. we figured some day it bill be divisive factor. the you can can make a plausible argument that in this election it really was a decisive factors, and we can ask, how much of a decisive factor was it? how much did it matter in the outcome. not just the presidential rateraise but the congressional races and state races. why was it such a decisive factor? why now and not other teams -- times. how much was immigration policy factor in this? i think we'll hear from the panelists. these are actually different things, immigration policy has a different set of constituency, and to what extent did immigration policy play into this and are there effect ops immigration policy, and also ways that candidates approach issues that ma
Search Results 0 to 23 of about 24